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Community of Sproat Lake

Sproat Lake Community

Community

SL Community Association maintains the Sproat Lake area, and its pristine drinking water.  It is truly a unique place to live, vacation and play.  Sproat Lake is a place where residents live the lifestyle of abundance, in nature.

Residents in the community enjoy hot summers and temperate winters.  They enjoy many opportunities for year-round recreation. Namely, cycling; hiking; swimming; stand-up paddling; wake boarding; water skiing; diving and much more.

The community is a favourite place for photographers, bird watchers, and leisure enthusiasts alike to find their passions.

A fourteen member board of directors governs the SLCA.   These individuals, from our community, take an active role in current issues.  Plus they deal with concerns throughout Area  “D” Sproat Lake in the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District.

The purpose of our society is as stated in the 1948 constitution, “to acquire, operate and maintain premises for community purposes. And to encourage and foster the growth of community spirit in the Sproat Lake Area. It is about providing social, recreational and athletic facilities for the enjoyment of it’s members.  To acquire and hold licenses, franchises, real and personal property, and to do all things necessary or incidental to the foregoing.”

Change of Name

A certificate of “Change of Name” was issued for the SLCA on June 16, 1995.  In November 2005 a referendum was passed through our local government (Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District) to allow SLCA membership fees to be collected along with other regional taxes.  This has allowed us to take an active stewardship role.  Mainly for water testing and keeping records of our water quality issues.
The main land use in the Sproat Lake area is forestry.  We have three provincial parks, and a few campgrounds including wild camping.  Sproat Lake is has steelhead, rainbow trout, and now koi.  Our lake is popular for recreational boating/water sports, including houseboats.  Sproat Lake has three ecologically sensitive areas: the western tips of both Taylor Arm; Two Rivers Arm; and the eastern tip of Faber Arm (Wilson 2010, Pers. Comm.)

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