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Wildfire News

JULY 25, 2014

Temporary Lifting of the Campfire Ban

See detailed weather forecast page 4

How Does a Campfire Start a Wildfire?

Wildfire News, has three ways on how your campfire could destroy the forest where you like to camp:
1) Sparks can be carried long distances on updrafts from campfires and can ignite dry forest fuels, either in trees or on the ground. By keeping your fire small, hot and burning efficiently, you help minimize the risk that your campfire will start a wildfire.

2)Fire can “creep away” from your campfire if you do not establish a fuel-free zone around it. Clear all flammable material away from the campfire site and rake ordig down to mineral soil to break contact between your campfire and nearby forest fuels.
3)Heat conduction can ignite firewood that is stored too close to a campfire. It can also ignite roots underground.
When you’re finished with your campfire, it is imperative that you extinguish it completely. Double-check that the fire is out before you leave your campsite.

Dumping water on a campfire is only the start of the process. Stirring the ashes and re-applying water exposes above-ground fuels to moisture and cooling. However, if you can detect a “return of heat” after the water has evaporated, you need to keep going. It’s possible that the culprit is a log that is still burning inside or a smouldering root under your campfire site. Keep wetting down and stirring the embers and ashes until all remnants of the fire are cold to the touch.

The only way to be sure that your campfire is completely out is to use your hand (carefully) to feel for any residual heat and, if you feel any, keep working to fully extinguish the fire.

Effective July 23, 2014, campfires were once again permitted throughout the Coastal Fire Centre’s jurisdiction. The Coastal Fire Centre rescinded itsprevious campfire prohibition due to forecasted cool and rainy weather conditions.

The following uses are now allowed:

The weeks after and possibly the week prior to the B.C. Day long weekend (Aug. 2-4).

The public is reminded that campfires can not be larger than a half-metre high by a half-metre wide. Anyone who lights a campfire must have a hand tool (such as a shovel) or at least eight litres of water available to fully extinguish it.

Never leave a campfire unattended and make sure that the ashes are completely cold to the touch before

leaving the area for any length of time.

Tiki torches, fireworks, sky lanterns and burn barrels remain prohibited throughout the Coastal Fire Centre, with the exception of Haida Gwaii and the “fog zone”.

 

campfires, as defined by the wildfire regulation
open fires in an outdoor stove

Over the next few days, most areas within the Coastal Fire Centre will see (or have already experienced) substantial rainfall. The long-term forecast, however, is for a return to hot and dry conditions after the July 26-27 weekend. The Coastal Fire Centre expects to prohibit campfires again within the next two

Page 1

To Report a Wildfire: 18006635555 Or Cell *5555

Fog Zone:

A two kilometre strip on the outer coast of Vancou- ver Island, from Owen Point near Port Renfrew, and stretching north to the tip of Vancouver Island, wrapping back to the eastern boundary of Port Hardy. The strip stretches inland 2 km from the high tide point.

Try adding Sage to a campfire to keep the mosquitoes away.

Before You Have a Campfire

The two primary questions to consider before building a campfire are:

  •   Are campfires prohibited? (For the most currentinformation on burning prohibitions, visit:www.bcwildfire.ca
  •   What jurisdiction is responsible for the locationwhere I want to have my campfire? (If you are in a regulated campground, notices should be posted. If you are not in a regulated campground, you need to find out which jurisdiction covers your proposed campfire site (a local government, the Wildfire Management Branch, etc.).Once you confirm that you are allowed to have a campfire, consider the burning conditions. Do not build a campfire if it is windy or if your proposed site seems excessively dry.The selection of your campfire site is important. Use an existing fire pit or, if there is no fire pit, build your campfire on mineral soil and place a ring of rocks

around it to contain the fire. Do not light a campfire near tents, dry forest debris or overhanging branches.

Wildfire News

During a Campfire

Here are a few reminders to help keep you safe when you have a campfire:

  •   Store your firewood at least 10 feet away from the fire to avoid having embers ignite your woodpile.
  •   At no time should children be left alone by the fire. An adult should always be present and monitoring the campfire. This is a great opportunity to teach campfire safety to children, so lead by example. Teach children that if a spark lands on them, they should “Stop! Drop! Roll!” It’s preferable to wear clothes made of natural fibres (like cotton or wool) around campfires. Synthetic fabrics can burn easily or melt and stick to skin.
  •   Always extinguish your fire before retiring for the night. Children could get burned while playing around the campfire site in the morning if the fire was not extinguished properly the night before.
  •   Never put glass, cans or aerosol containers in a campfire. They may shatter or explode and may cause an injury.
  •   Never put unopened tins of food on a fire to cook. They may explode.

Building a Campfire

Experienced campers always maintain their campfires and keep them manageable. In British Columbia, the maximum allowable size of a campfire is 0.5 metres wide by 0.5 metres high. This size of fire provides sufficient heat and is easy to manage and put out.

When preparing your campfire site, do not use rocks from a river bed. They may split when heated and could injure people nearby. Also make sure you do not building a campfire on top of tree roots.

Perhaps the most important rule for having a safe campfire is to monitor it at all times. Do not leave it burning unattended for any reason or for any length of time. Remember that if you light a campfire, you are responsible for it. You also must have the means available to put it out, using a shovel or at least eight litres of water.

A campfire should only burn woody debris. Do not start a fire or keep it burning by using other materials. Gasoline and other highly flammable substances should not be needed to start a campfire. If you’re having difficulty getting the fire started then your wood is probably too wet. Do not burn garbage, plastics or grease, since that could potentially create a hazard for people near the campfire.

After a Campfire

When you’re finished using your campfire, put it out. Never just leave it to burn down. Too many times, our Surface Patrol staff find campfires still smouldering and no one in sight. If a fire is not correctly extinguished, even a light wind could bring it back to life.

Make sure that the campfire is extinguished by wetting it down, stirring the water into the ashes and repeating the process until the fire is completely out. Remember: do not simply put sand on a fire, since the coals underneath may stay hot (up to 38 degrees Celsius) for up to eight hours. A child could come along after you have left the campsite, play in the fire pit and get badly burned.

Learn to “cold trail” your fire, like our firefighting crews cold trail a wildfire site. Put out the fire and then carefully place your hand a few centimetres over the area to make sure it feels cold. Then gradually bring your hand closer to where the fire was. Once you are convinced that the fire is completely out, slowly and carefully run your fingers through the ashes and debris to make sure no hot spots remain.

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To Report a Wildfire: 18006635555 Or Cell *5555

If you dread the thought of camping without the sound of a campfire crackling in the background there are now Apps you can download.

Glow Sticks are a great item to pack on your next camping trip. You can play Ring Toss, Hopscotch, or have the kids make up a game.
Don’t forget to make a collar for the dog so Fido’s easy to see.

Re-create that Campfire Feeling by Donna MacPherson, FIO

What is it about a campfire that’s so wonderful? What does it contribute to your camping experience? How can you re-create the magic of a campfire if campfires are prohibited where you’re going?

I think a clue to answering these questions is the popularity of the “yule log” videos that run on TV during the holiday season. I’ve been at parties where the TV becomes a fireplace and people congregate around it to watch the video. Its appeal seems to be a combination of the flickering light and the “snap” and “pop” of the wood. People even exclaim when a hand appears to add a log to the fire.

A real campfire stimulates our senses with light, sounds and smells. It provides focus, safety, security, food and a place for social gatherings. However, if you can’t light a campfire where you are, you’ll have to do a bit of creative thinking. Here are some suggestions that might help:

Light – The flickering light provides a atmosphere of safety and coziness. It’s bright enough to see nearby faces without being glaring. It sends light all the way to the edge of your camping space, keeping unwanted animals at bay. Perhaps you can re-create this effect with a propane campfire, tea lights on a flame-proof pan, batter-powered “flickering” LED candles, or solar -powered garden lights set out at the periphery of your campsite.

Sound – White noise helps mask intrusive noises without blocking them completely. Common types of white noise are audio files of bird calls, rain, waterfalls, wind and waves. You can even download audio files of campfires, including their pop and snap. Another option is to play music at your campsite (softly, please!) and if you have a musician in the family, a sing-along is always fun.

Smell – It’s hard to mimic the smell of a campfire, but you can engage your sense of smell with scented candles (or even better, the smell of food cooking).

Food – Think of what you can cook on your “campfire alternative.” Make it a bit of a production: announce what you’ll be making; take time to prepare it; provide updates on how the food is coming along and savour the flavours that you create – just like you would if you were cooking hotdogs on a campfire. You could also make hot chocolate (prepared in small batches on your camp stove, with canned whipped cream and sprinkles), S’mores (prepared on your propane campfire) or piping hot soup that smells amazing. These are all things that your family can look forward

to and enjoy together. Try to involve others in food preparation to share the fun.

Security – What makes you
and others feel safe? How can
you re-create the feeling of
well-being that a fire offers?
Campfires have long been used to create a protected space and keep creatures at bay. We might not need to ward off packs of wolves anymore, but what else could you do to get a similar sense of security? How about cuddling together under a blanket and sitting together, rather than separately on folding chairs?

Community – A campfire provides a focus. It’s something to gaze at and seems to stimulate conversation. People like to congregate to share the warmth and camaraderie. If you have a campfire ring at your campsite but there’s a campfire ban in place, think of other ways to create memories. Perhaps place a propane campfire inside the campfire ring or fill the ring with tea lights. Think of a game to play or encourage storytelling. Share stories with each other Try a story round-robin, where one person starts a story and then passes it off at an exciting point in the tale for the next person to carry forward, adding their own twist to the tale. Share jokes and laughter. Spend time with each other and build those special memories.

Campfires can trigger moments of nostalgia – from your childhood perhaps – and memories that we want to share with family and friends. It’s not the campfire that makes the moment special, but taking the time to enjoy each other’s company does. You can fondly remember those moments during the winter, perhaps as you’re all gathered around your crackling yule log video.

Try warming slices of angel food cake on the camp stove or on a stick over the fire. Place slices directly on the grill for 30 seconds each side or allow children to toast on a stick over the camp stove or campfire (supervised, of course). Slice berries, place in a foil pocket with some brown sugar. Put onto the grill a few minutes on each side. Serve the warm berries over toasted angel food cake. Whipped cream? Up to you!

*You can also do this on the BBQ at home.

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To Report a Wildfire: 18006635555 Or Cell *5555

To Date in Coastal

Fires to Date

Surface Patrols

1000 800 600 400 200 0

Unattended/Extinguished Campfires

Unattended/Extinguis hed Campfires

The Coastal Fire Centre uses Surface Patrols as a second set of eyes. These patrols follow predetermined routes (by ground or boat) in areas where elevated fire risks and high recreational use could potentially create a fire hazard.

With about 75% of B.C.’s population residing in the Coastal Fire Centre, the number of people who participate in recreational activities in the backcountry is significant. During the summer months (particularly on long weekends or during special events), the number are higher and that can increase the risk of wildfire ignition.

Surface Patrols provide an additional layer of protection for the public. In the course of a patrol, these individuals evaluate and monitor areas known for recreational (and sometimes illegal) activities.

The people who conduct these patrols counsel and advise the public on safe backcountry practices, but they still have to deal with an unacceptably high abuse rate.

At Coastal

The Coastal Fire Centre is one of six provincial fire centres in the province. We are a provincial resource that is both flexible and fluid. Currently we have personnel from within the Coastal Fire Centre, both employees of the Wildfire Management Branch and other Ministries, helping out in other centres.

While our folks are away helping out in other Centres we rely heavily on our friends in other parts of government to help fill various roles.

Please help us out by abiding by the prohibitions and by reporting wildfires news and unattended and abandoned campfires to our 1-800 line.

The Nahatlatch Forest Service Road remains closed as work on fires in the area are ongoing.

Our Surface Patrol personnel extinguish about 489 abandoned campfires per year (10 year average) number of abandoned and unattended campfires. In 2013, Surface Patrols reported 167 illegal fires, 190 abandoned fires and 19 unattended fires. They covered approximately 150,000 kilometres and spoke to approximately 25,187 people along the way.

Weather

SYNOPSIS: Building upper ridge has stabilized the atmosphere allowing overnight moisture to form layers of marine clouds. Most areas are cloudy and clearing will be slow today perhaps taking until mid afternoon for the sun to break through. Unless of course it is already clear in which case the sun will bring early heating which will help generate more cloudiness and possibly a brief afternoon shower. At least its dry and warmer. Showers are noted for the Bella Coola area as the onshore flow over the Mid-coast continues and steady rain is likely later today over Haida Gwaii. The Hagensborg showers will drift north later today. The ridge is stronger tomorrow and after overnight clouds reform morning clearing will be more rapid and this brings warmer temperatures. Winds continue as light inflows today and tomorrow.

OUTLOOK: The strong upper ridge peaks Sunday through Tuesday but it stays centred east of the Coastal zones. Even so the afternoon highs continue to ramp up and by Monday we should see mid 20s near the water and low 30s through the inland valleys. The heat brings the formation of an inverted thermal trough and this leads to areas of poor morning recovery for Monday and Tuesday and many inland areas will record afternoon relative humidity under 20 per cent.

6 TO 10 DAY: A pattern change starts Wednesday as sub-tropical moisture starts to percolate over Washington state and flows northeastward
towards the Fraser Valley and Manning Park. Page 4

 

 

If you were going to build a treehouse, what would it look like?

What would you have in it?

If you were going to have a dinner party and could invite anyone, who would you invite and why?

If you could invent something, what would
you invent?

If you were going on a long trip, what three things or toys (besides your clothes)
would you bring?

If you could have any job, what would you choose and why?

If you were a character in your favourite book, who would you be
and why?

If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would
it be and what would you
do there?

What is the best meal you have ever eaten?

If you could change your name, what would you call yourself?

What is your favourite thing to do while camping?

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What three things does a fire need to burn? (heat, fuel and oxygen)

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

Where should you build a campfire? (in a safe location on mineral soil)

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What do you use to start a campfire? (a match, not oil or gas)

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What must you do with a campfire? (monitor it at all times)

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What percentages of fires in B.C. are human- caused? (approximately 50%)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What is the maximum legal size of a campfire in B.C.? (.5 metres wide X .5 metres high)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What must you do before building a campfire? (check if local jurisdictions allow it)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What must you do before leaving your campsite? (put out your campfire completely)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

To extinguish a fire, what do you need? (a shovel or at least 8 litres of water)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What is the wildfire reporting number? (1 800 663-5555 or *5555 on your cell)

 

 

If you had to create a new crayon, what colour would it be and what would you name it?

If you could have any kind of pet, what would you like to have?

If you could have one superpower, what would it be?

What is your favourite ice cream flavour?
If you could make any new flavour, what would you make?

If you could only celebrate one holiday, which holiday would you pick?

What is your favourite word and why?

What five words would you use to describe yourself?

If you could be famous, what would you be famous for?

What is your favourite toy of all time?

What is your favourite cartoon
of all time?

Wildfire News:

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

Who is responsible for a campfire that escapes? (the person who lights it)

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

How far can lightning strike away from a storm cell? (about 15 kilometres)

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

When was the first aircraft used to fight wildfires in B.C.? (1918)

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

Coastal Detection Patrols put out how many campfires each year? (about 500)

For the most up-to-date fire information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What should you do with a campfire in windy conditions? (put it out)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What year was Smokey the Bear born? (1944)

For the most up-to-date fire Information on wildfire news, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo   Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

What should you do if you see an abandoned campfire? (put it out if it’s manageable or call it in)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

Charcoal briquettes take how long to cool? (up to 48 hours if not doused in water)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

How big is the Coastal Fire Centre? (12.8 million hectares)

For the most up-to-date fire Information, go to: www.bcwildfire.ca Twitter: BCGovFireInfo Facebook: BCForestFireInfo

How can off-road vehicles start fires? (exhaust systems, metal scraping on rocks)

 

 

 

About Sproat Lake Community Association

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